Eggs

There is a scene in Julie & Julia where they spend hours and hours trying to properly poach eggs.

For a long time, I had a deep fear of poached eggs. Having never encountered them, I always thought they would be runny and gushy. However, the first time I had a poached egg, during brunch at Alice’s Tea Cup, I was quite pleased to find that that was not at all true. The egg whites are cooked, but soft and almost fluffy. The yolk is warmed and runny, tasting totally rich and delicious.

Since then, I have had the pleasure of poaching many an egg.
Maybe it’s just me, but I really do not understand why it’s so difficult to poach an egg. These are ones I made for breakfast this morning and I have to say other than a broken yolk, these were quite lovely. I enjoyed them with Canadian Bacon.

I’m not sure there’s a secret to how I make a poached egg. When I first wanted to make poached eggs, I used this tutorial from WikiHow. I’ve adapted that to make it easier and more fool-proof for myself.

Here’s my process to make a poached egg.

  • Fill a medium saucepan with water and a splash of vinegar.
  • Heat the water until it reaches shivering point – right before boiling.
  • Crack an egg into a ladle.
  • Place the ladle into the water, letting some of the water in to temper the egg white.
  • Pour the egg out of the ladle and let it cook for about 3-4 minutes.
  • Use a slotted spoon or a spider to remove the eggs from the water. Let any water drain.
  • Serve the eggs on toasted, buttered English muffins.
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